“The central device of Trumbo’s novel is the body of the protagonist, a young American soldier who, incredibly, has lost his face and both arms and legs during combat. Unable to see, speak, hear, smell, or act, he is fully conscious, but seemingly completely without agency. As he struggles to come to terms with his personal tragedy, he strains to communicate with the outside world. The entire book was written without commas, though all other punctuation conforms to established conventions.”

Antonia Hirsch, Komma (after Dalton Trumbo’s Johnny Got His Gun), 2010

“What I am looking for… is an immobile movement, something which would be the equivalent of what is called the eloquence of silence, or what St. John of the Cross, I think it was, described with the term mute music.” — Joan Miro

Yousuf Karsh, Pablo Casals, 1954 (Karsh, p. 163)

“What I am looking for… is an immobile movement, something which would be the equivalent of what is called the eloquence of silence, or what St. John of the Cross, I think it was, described with the term mute music.” — Joan Miro

Yousuf Karsh, Pablo Casals, 1954 (Karsh, p. 163)

Zöllner’s illusion and Agnes Martin’s lines, Color pencil drawing (diptych), 2010

Transcendental Physics, Toril Johannessen [more information here and here]

Zöllner’s illusion and Agnes Martin’s lines, Color pencil drawing (diptych), 2010

Transcendental Physics, Toril Johannessen [more information here and here]

“I believe that our sense of experience is built up over time - a composite of many short-term events. […] The ocean has always made me feel calm, relaxed, and contented. If I were to take an instantaneous snapshot of the ocean, the photo would include waves with jagged edges, salt spray, and foam. This type of image does not make me feel calm - it does not represent how the ocean makes me feel as I stare out over the water. With this series of images I have used the camera as a scientific instrument, the way a biologist might use a microscope or an astronomer a telescope, to reveal what is felt but often unseen.” —— [read rest of the artist statement here]

David Fokos, Solar Eclipse I - June 10, 2002, San Diego, California (2002) [+]

“I believe that our sense of experience is built up over time - a composite of many short-term events. […] The ocean has always made me feel calm, relaxed, and contented. If I were to take an instantaneous snapshot of the ocean, the photo would include waves with jagged edges, salt spray, and foam. This type of image does not make me feel calm - it does not represent how the ocean makes me feel as I stare out over the water. With this series of images I have used the camera as a scientific instrument, the way a biologist might use a microscope or an astronomer a telescope, to reveal what is felt but often unseen.” —— [read rest of the artist statement here]

David Fokos, Solar Eclipse I - June 10, 2002, San Diego, California (2002) [+]

Mikhail Grachev, The Rain, Moscow, 1939

Mikhail Grachev, The Rain, Moscow, 1939

Yakov Khalip, Fathers to the Front, Children to the Factories, Moscow, 1941

Yakov Khalip, Fathers to the Front, Children to the Factories, Moscow, 1941